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Getting Some Assistance - Treatment

What Is Drug Addiction?

Drug dependence is an unrelenting illness that presents in obsessive, or out of control drive to access the drug at any cost even when one is aware of the danger and long lasting harm effects on their brain. Some people whose brain functions have been altered by drugs display some anti-social mannerisms. Drug dependency is a degenerative illness. Relapse is the reoccurrence to drug use after an endeavour to stop.


The way to drug dependence starts with the wilful act of using drugs. However, as time passes, an individual's ability to decide not to use drugs weakens. Looking for and taking the drugs gets to be distinctly compulsive. The major cause of this it how long term drug exposure alters brain activity. The parts of the brain that control reward and motivation, learning and memory, and self control are all significantly affected by addiction.

Dependency is an illness that affects behaviour and the brain.


Can Drug Addiction Be Treated?

There is, but it is a long journey. Since addiction is a chronic ailment, individuals can't just quit utilizing drugs for a couple days and be treated. For most patients, long term often repeated care is needed to help them stop using and continue on to get their lives back.


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Rehabilitation from drug use should result in the patient:

  • Stop taking drugs
  • remain drug-free
  • be profitable in the family, at work and in the public arena

Principles Behind Effective Treatment

In light of logical research since the mid-1970s, the accompanying key standards ought to frame the premise of any compelling treatment program:

  • Though a complex brain altering illness, drug dependency can be successfully treated.
  • No single treatment is appropriate for everybody.
  • Individuals must be able to access treatment quickly.
  • Treatment deals with more than just drug use, addressing all of the patient's needs.
  • It is extremely important to remain under treatment for a very long period of time.
  • The most common forms of treatment are behaviour therapies like counselling.
  • Behavioural therapies are often combined with medications, which are another important aspect of therapy.
  • To make sure the user's most current requirements are met, there is a need for continuous evaluations and adjustments to the treatment regime.
  • Some other associated mental problems must be taken care of by treatments.
  • The cleansing administered by medical personnel is the beginning step of the journey.
  • Treatment doesn't require being voluntary to be successful.
  • During treatments, the use of drugs by the patient must be properly observed.
  • Patients in treatment should be tested for a variety of infectious diseases, such as HIV/AIDS, hepatitis B and C, and tuberculosis and also receive education about how to reduce the risk of getting thee illnesses.

How Is Drug Addiction Treated?

Effective treatment comprises many steps:

  • Detoxification (the way a body is cleaned of toxins and drug residue)
  • Therapy or counselling
  • medication (for tobacco, alcohol or opioid dependency)
  • assessment and treatment for any co-occurring mental health concerns like anxiety and depression
  • long haul follow-up to forestall backslide

A variety of care with a customised treatment programme and follow-up options can be key to being successful.


Depending on the level of need, mental health services should be added to the medical aspect of any treatment. Post-rehab support could involve the peer or family group therapy.


How Are Meds Utilised As A Part Of Drug Compulsion Treatment?

Administered under professional supervision, prescription medicines are used to help the patient ease into a life without the effects of the drug, stop cravings and manage associated ailments.

  • Withdrawal The withdrawal symptoms that are witnessed when detox is done could be alleviated with medications. Detoxification is not in itself "treatment," rather just the initial phase all the while. Patients who only go through detoxification and don't have any additional treatment typically relapse back into drug use. As revealed by a study of treatment facilities, 80% of the cases of detoxification involved medications (SAMHSA, 2014).
  • Preventing A Relapse Medicines used in the detoxing programme help the brain to restore to its normal functions easier and stop the desire for the drug. Alcohol addiction, tobacco (nicotine) and opioid (heroin, prescription pain relievers) have medications for their treatments. Medications that could be used in treating cannabis (marijuana) and stimulant (cocaine, methamphetamine) addiction are being developed by scientists at present. A person who uses more than one substance, which is really typical, require treatment for every substance he/she uses.

What About Behavioural Therapies And Drug Addiction

Patients are assisted by behavioural therapies to:

  • change their character and disposition towards the use of drugs
  • Learn to exercise healthy life skills
  • continue receiving medication and other types of treatment

There are a lot of settings and approaches for patients who are seeking treatment.

Outpatient behavioural treatment incorporates a wide assortment of projects for patients who visit a behavioural health counsellor on a fixed schedule. The majority of the programmes incorporate group or one-to-one substance counselling or both these forms.


Treatments available in some of these treatment sessions address psychological issues like:

  • cognitive-behavioural therapy, that assists a patient to identify, steer clear of, and deal with the circumstances in which he/she is most probable to resort to substances
  • Multidimensional family therapy in which not just the patient but also his/her family is involved able to sort out a lot of things and help the whole family cope with the changes and heal together
  • Motivational meeting, which capitalizes on individual's' status to change their conduct and enter treatment
  • Motivational impetuses (possibility management), which utilizes uplifting feedback to support restraint from medications

sometimes, intensive treatments that involve several outpatient sessions every week is given at first. With the detox behind them, the patient is then able to start standard treatment regime coming in for therapy a few hours weekly to make sure they do not relapse.


Patients dealing with complications caused by long time abuse of drugs may benefit greatly from inpatient also known as residential rehabilitation services. The around the clock care available at residential rehabilitation centres includes safe boarding facilities and close monitoring of patients. Inpatient treatment facilities can use many therapeutic approaches and are usually working toward assisting the patient after treatment to maintain a drug free, crime free lifestyle.


The following are some examples of residential treatment settings are:

  • Rigidly structured programs where patients remain inpatient for 6 to 12 months are called therapeutic communities. The whole community, everyone from the staff to the patients in recovery, act as agents of change, helping to change every patient's attitude, understanding, and behaviour toward drug use.
  • Shorter-term residential treatment, where detoxification is done and the patient prepared for community based treatment through preliminary intensive counselling.
  • Recovery housing that offers supervised, short-term accommodation for a patient, frequently after other kinds of inpatient/residential treatment. The recovery housing programme provides a bridge for the patients between the long term inpatient facility and re-joining the society; patients are helped to prepare for life on the outside by enabling them to look for jobs and learn how to take care and budget their money.

Challenges Of Re-Entry

Substance abuse alters the functioning of the brain, and several things can activate a craving for the substance within the brain. For everyone in treatment, but especially for those in an inpatient program or prison, it's essential to learn how to recognize, avoid, and handle any triggers they may encounter after treatment.